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Regional Water Authority Mini-Grants for Teachers

The Whitney Water Center is celebrating 25 years of environmental education this year. Those 25 years would not have been possible without the support of teachers. In recognition of your support, the South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority is offering five $500 mini-grants to help support science teaching in our region.

This program is designed to provide mini-grants to teachers who have participated in Whitney Water Center programs:

  • School programs at the Whitney Water Center
  • Programs at your school 
  • Project WATER, and/or
  • Water Science Loan Boxes. 

The purpose of these small grants ($500 each) is to enable you to try out creative teaching techniques and buy enriching teaching materials not provided for in your school’s budget. The project must have a focus on environmental education, particularly about water. All grant recipients are expected to report on the expenditure of grant funds and results of the supported project within one year of the award.

To Apply

Click on the following link to obtain an application form:
Application Form

Eligibility

Teachers in the school districts and leaders of organized groups within the Regional Water Authority’s district are eligible to apply. You must have taken part in at least one of the Whitney Water Center’s educational offerings in the last 25 years.

Grant Amounts

There will be five $500 grants.

Timeline

  • Application deadline: March 31, 2016
  • Grants announced: April 4, 2015
  • Grants payable to schools: Earth Week, April 18-22, 2016
  • Project evaluation and reports due: April 2017

Mini Grants Criteria

A committee consisting of Regional Water Authority employees and others will review applications. The committee members will not know the identity of the teacher and school. Applications will be judged on the following criteria:

  • Impact: Potential to improve student achievement; potential to enhance instructional skills
  • Innovation: Creativity of project; innovative approach; academic objective with curriculum context
  • Planning: Clear plan for project implementation
  • Existing resources: Project cannot be achieved with existing school budget

Excluded Projects

Mini-grant applications will not be considered for:

  • Renovation of facilities;
  • Religious activities or teachings;
  • Equipment that is not an integral part of the project;
  • Non-academic projects;
  • Trips out of this region; or
  • Tuition for special classes

Grantees must provide a written report to the Regional Water Authority at the conclusion of their project. This report must include a financial statement and narrative describing the project and how it benefited students and the teacher.

Contact Information:

Kate Powell: kpowell@rwater.com
Lisa DiFrancesco: ldifrancesco@rwater.com

 

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