GNH Community

for the greater good of Greater New Haven

From the Department of Social Services:

 

We have received approval from FNS to automatically mass reissue 25% of our SNAP households’ August benefits to help with food losses caused by Tropical Storm Irene.

  • All Connecticut households who received SNAP when Tropical Storm Irene hit the state automatically received these additional benefits. 
  • These benefits were automatically added to SNAP household’s EBT accounts and are available today. 
  • JP Morgan is updating their telephone message for SNAP clients who call in to check their accounts to inform them that we’ve added these benefits to their accounts.

While this 25% automatic mass SNAP benefit reissuance will help many households with food losses, some SNAP households may have lost food purchased with SNAP valued at more than 25% of their August benefits. 

  • These households can request additional individual replacement SNAP benefits above the 25% already provided. 
  • The amount of the individual request must be based on the value of food purchased with SNAP that was lost due to the storm.
  • The amount of the 25% mass reissuance, plus the individual replacement request, cannot be more than their August benefit amount.

2-1-1 Infoline will be the point of contact for reports of food losses and the return of Request Forms.  Effective immediately, please refer any requests for individual SNAP replacement benefits to 2-1-1 Infoline. 

  • Households must report food losses to 2-1-1 Infoline no later than 4:30 pm on September 19, 2011. 
  • Households must return a completed Request Form that 2-1-1 Infoline will provide to them within 10 days of the date that they reported the food loss.
  • 2-1-1 is the point of return for all Request Forms. 
  • Households will be directed to return Request Forms to 2-1-1 Infoline (2-1-1 will provide a prepaid return envelope).
  • If a household returns a Request Form to you in error, please date stamp the form and forward it to 2-1-1 Infoline at

2-1-1 Infoline

  • 2-1-1 Infoline will log reports of food losses and subsequent receipt of Request Forms.
  • 2-1-1 Infoline will forward Request Forms to the C.O. Central Processing Unit (CPU). 
  • The CPU will process these Request Forms, issuing individual replacement benefits to eligible households and denying requests from ineligible households.

 

Views: 199

Tags: DSS, EBO, SNAP

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