GNH Community

nonprofits,local leaders & Grt.New Haven business sharing information

Best Practices are Flawed Because We Are Human by JAMIE NOTTER

Best Practices are Flawed Because We Are Human - JAMIE NOTTER http://www.getmejamienotter.com/getmejamienotter/2010/02/best-pract...

I love the association community, but I don't like our obsession with "best practices." Having said that, I have to admit that I get some benefit from the obsession. Volunteer Boards I think get a lot of comfort out of the idea--that we, the somewhat-trusted staff, have access to this pool of "best practices" in association management that the volunteers could never know about coming from a d

ifferent industry. "The staff knows the best practices," the Board members tell each other, "so let them do their job. Let's not reinvent the wheel." I admit it: it makes my job easier.

But I have also written about the dangers of best practices, as have many, manysmart people. There are compelling arguments why best practices don't work, given the uniqueness of organizational cultures, the inability to track true cause and effect in organizations, and the power of coming up with your OWN solutions. The most recent argument comes from a blog post by Holly Green: best practices are flawed because we are human beings.

Best practices are developed by experts. Why is this a problem? Holly says:

Because experts are human, and as humans we don't believe what we see. Instead, we see what we already believe. We constantly seek to prove what we think is right, and as a result we miss critical data and limit our success by getting locked into ideas and assumptions that may no longer be true.

Best practices will never go away entirely, but we need to wake up to how they are robbing our organizations of the capacity to be successful. Pay attention to where your reliance on experts blocks your system's ability to learn. Be honest with yourself about the cost of choosing the comfortable, less contentious path in your Board conversations (these are association best practices; trust us). Challenge your own expertise, constantly.

Views: 12

Comment

You need to be a member of GNH Community to add comments!

Join GNH Community

Now available in multiple languages

Welcome (Bienvenido, Benvenuto, Powitanie, Bonjour! Willkomme,歡迎, ברוךהבא أهلا وسهلا, Bonvenon) to GNH Community

traducción, traduzione, tłumaczenie, traduction, Übersetzung, 翻译, תרגום أهلا ترجمة, traduko

                    

Imagine. Inform. Invest. Inspire.

Working together to build a stronger community - now and forever

 

 

Neighborhoods: What is Working

Open Street Project

An Open Streets Family Reunion: Reflections from the 2018 Open Streets Summit

By Ryan O’Connor, Director of Programs, 8 80 Cities Recently 8 80 Cities wrote a blog post about open streets being a labour of love. That being the case, the 2018 Open Streets Summit in New Orleans felt like a family reunion of sorts. It was rejuvenating to see old and new friends who share our passion for open streets and are working tirelessly to create healthier, happier, and more connected communities across the world. The event, which took place on September 15-16, brought together more than 50 leaders who currently organize open streets programs or are interested in bringing the...

The post An Open Streets Family Reunion: Reflections from the 2018 Open Streets Summit appeared first on Open Streets Project.

Open Streets Summit Draft Agenda

We hope you are getting ready and feel excited about the Open Streets Summit in Gretna/New Orleans! Taking place from September 15-16, 2018, the Summit will feature tours, presentations and networking opportunities with open streets champions and organizers from across the continent. Attendees will learn about the nuts and bolts of starting or scaling up open streets programs, including: Route design and planning Partnerships with business and officials Social inclusion Safety and logistics Marketing and promotion Program evaluation through measurable goals and metrics If you haven’t done it yet, click here to register for the Open Streets Summit only or...

The post Open Streets Summit Draft Agenda appeared first on Open Streets Project.

Open Streets Summit Speakers Announced!

The Open Streets Project is proud to announce that Ed Solis from Viva Calle (San Jose, CA), Romel Pascual from CicLAvia (Los Angeles, CA), Jaymie Santiago and Charles Brown from New Brunswick Ciclovia will join us as speakers for the 2018 Open Streets Summit in New Orleans and Gretna! Taking place from September 15-16 2018, the Summit will feature: Behind the scenes tour of the City of Gretna’s inaugural open streets program. Workshops, presentations, and networking opportunities with open streets champions and organizers from across the continent. Training and inspiration for both -novice and experienced- open streets organizers and supporters...

The post Open Streets Summit Speakers Announced! appeared first on Open Streets Project.

Local Initiatives Support Corporation

The Power of Neighborhood Connection

Since 2012, LISC Philadelphia has been supporting and honing the Community Connectors program, forging a model for resident engagement rooted in local places, that leverages local knowledge and strengths. An article in Generocity delves into the workings of the program, the neighborhood people who make it tick and how LISC’s sustained partnership has helped improve community connection, safety and wellbeing across the city.

Jane Ferrara is New Executive Director of LISC Virginia

LISC has named one of Richmond's leading voices on economic development to head its community investment efforts in central Virginia. Jane Ferrara, who most recently served as Richmond’s senior deputy director for economic development, will direct LISC’s local efforts to expand affordable housing, businesses and jobs as part of a comprehensive strategy to catalyze opportunity for residents.

Language and the Way We Think About Stigmatized Groups: Q&A with Esther Uduehi

LISC’s Emerging Leader Council member Esther Uduehi is a doctoral candidate at The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania where her research focuses on the language associated with stigmatized groups and marginalized communities. Uduehi recently sat down with LISC to discuss how nonprofits and practitioners can put her findings to use, and the need to create more conversations using person-centered language.

© 2020   Created by Lee Cruz.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service