Fighting For One's Good Name Is NOT About Money - Truth Versus POWER!

For The Third Time, Immigrant Cleared In Cop-Attack Case - NHI

by Thomas MacMillan | Jul 30, 2013 6:13 pm

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"Three years after being arrested for allegedly assaulting a cop, Luis Jimenez was found not guilty—for the third time.

The verdict paves the way for a civil case Jiminez has filed against the cops who arrested him, and it means his lawyer will add another complaint: malicious prosecution.

The verdict came down from Judge Michael Kamp Tuesday afternoon in Courtroom C of state Superior Court on Elm Street. After a total of nine witnesses testified over seven days of testimony, Jimenez was found not guilty of creating a public disturbance, an infraction.

It ended a rare case of a defendant facing trial three times for the same charge, a minor charge at that. It featured an immigrant who fought back against the cops—three times—and prevailed.

Jimenez, who’s a widower from Ecuador, said fighting the charge against him meant he lost work as a driver. “My hope is that nobody will have to suffer this again,” he said.

(There is more to the article; it can be read in its entirety at the link below)

I applaud Mr. Jimenez 100 Percent for fighting for his good name and for preventing the police from smearing him with a lie, and from intimidating him with their abuse of power. Too often innocent citizens are coward into admitting to false charges made by police officers and others who are in positions of power.  These arrogant people who abuse their power often lie to cover up their malfeasance.  They put people through HELL as a way of justifying their actions, and will stop at nothing to protect their wrong.  Imagine, this innocent man was tried three times!  How outrageous!  I hope attorney Garlinghouse will now sue the police for malicious prosecution and persecution of Mr. Jimenez. 

Yes, Mr. Jimenez could have paid the $75, thereby admitting guilt for something he did not do.  It is not the money; it is his reputation; his good name; it is an example for his children. Immigrants,  women, and the poor are particularly vulnerable to these types of abuses.

As a child I learned a powerful verse from Shakespeare:

“He who steals my purse steals trash; it is something, yet nothing; and has been slave to thousands.
But he that filches from me my good name
Robs me of that which not enriches him and makes me poor indeed.”

Mr. Jimenez is poorer for his dollars, but richer for clearing his good name. This is a powerful and positive example for his children.  What is truly frightening is that there are prosecutors willing to take these so obviously bogus cases and persecute those they perceive to be vulnerable, and they do so to protect the powerful and to protect those who are supposed to protect the innocent.  Truly ironic and extremely frightening. Thankfully, in this case, the justice system worked!

http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/jimenez...

 

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Tags: Cop-Attack, Jimenez, Judge, Kamp, Luis, Michael, NHI, Power, Truth, Versus, More…abuse, cleared, cop-assault-case, immigrant, malfeasance, malicious, police, power, prosecution

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