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Asst Chief Casanova, Kica Matos, Rev. Kimber - A WAR of What Exactly?

AS OUR SOCIETY COARSEN’S FOUL LANGUAGE HAS BECOME STANDARD
Does this mean that we all must accept this and follow suit?
Is vulgar, crass language fine for police officers and their superiors to use wherever they are?
Is it too much to ask that our public officials conduct themselves responsibly, at least while they are representing their public jobs?
• Whatever happened to public decency and personal pride? Pride of office and pride of position? Are these now old fashioned?
• When a public official behaves badly, is the answer to organize a protest to protect that bad behavior?
• Is coarse, vulgar language by a superior officer to a subordinate acceptable conduct?
Interim Police Chief Anthony Campbell Monday suspended Casanova for one day over the incident, on charges of “conduct unbecoming an officer.” Casanova’s lawyer, Norm Pattis, blasted the suspension and said they’re considering legal action over it.
WNHH radio’s “Kica’s Corner” program, hosted by Kica Matos, who has organized a support rally for him (Casanova), planned to take place outside City Hall Wednesday at 12:30 p.m.
Matos began the program by calling Campbell’s decision to suspend Casanova a “bizarre overreaction” and a “horrible scandal.” Casanova refrained from directly addressing the incident, speaking instead about his philosophy of community policing and his 20-year career on the New Haven force. He said “real community policing” involves “building trust ... and relationships” and “really listening to the community,” treating the community with “respect and dignity.”
• What exactly is the “horrible scandal” to which Ms. Matos is referring?
• Casanova said “real community policing” involves “building trust ... and relationships” and “really listening to the community,” treating the community with “respect and dignity.”
• How ironic! Is cursing at a subordinate treating him with dignity and respect?
• If Asst Chief Casanova thinks using such language to a subordinate is appropriate, how can the black community trust that he will treat its other members with dignity and respect?
• In Ms. Matos’ dramatic reactions, why isn’t there a more comprehensive and practical evaluation of the total situation?
What is equally disturbing now is that there are Hispanics and African American people in the street protesting (essentially by taking sides) in a situation that should have been addressed more responsibly.
At a time when communities of color need to come together to fight against the forces of oppression that are at ALL of our doors, we are fighting each other! Let's step back and evaluate what this is really about.

http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/casanov...

OneWorld  Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do at any given time and on an ongoing basis.  We invite and appreciate technical and financial support.

OneWorld invites you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

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