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OCTOBER IS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH - EDUCATION IS KEY TO AWARENESS AND PREVENTION

October is Domestic Violence Awareness  Month.  Education is Key to Awareness and Prevention.

 The 24-hour toll-free hotline to report domestic violence in CT is 888-774-2900.  Confidential assistance is available, free of charge.

The Regional Center for Domestic Violence Services will hold a conference on “The Lethality of Domestic Violence” on October 19 in New Haven. Get more information here:
http://bhcare.org/page/16596—Center-for-Domestic-Violence-Services

SADLY, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE OFTEN STARTS VERY EARLY IN THE HOME. IT IS SOMETIMES DIFFICULT FOR TEENS AND EVEN ADULTS TO RECOGNIZE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE BECAUSE IT IS ALL THEY HAVE EVER KNOWN; THEREFORE, IT IS THEIR WAY OF LIFE. PARENTS WHO BATTER THEIR CHILDREN ARE TEACHING A DANGEROUS LESSON.  THERE IS A DISTINCT DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DISCIPLINE AND ABUSE!

WE HAVE LINKED SOME NATIONAL RESOURCES BELOW TO HELP PARENTS START CONVERSATIONS WITH THEIR CHILDREN ABOUT DOMESTIC / DATING VIOLENCE.

Talk with your teen about dating violence
Chicago Tribune, Sue Hubbard, M.D., 09/11/2012

It's a frightening number. According to a new survey by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 4 women say they are violently attacked by their intimate partner. As a pediatrician, I often talk with teenaged patients about dating abuse. My best advice to parents is to do the same. Your teen no doubt remembers all too well the headlines about pop star Rihanna and (then) boyfriend, Chris Brown's, dating rage. This Page 1story filtered through the halls of every middle school, high school and college. The unfortunate truth is that dating violence surrounds young people and affects everyone around them. The numbers are especially bad in the teen age group: One in three teenagers say they know a friend or peer who's been hit, punched, slapped, choked or physically hurt by their partner. This startling statistic is what is "reported." I can't help but wonder how many cases go unreported and remain whispers among friends? 

READ THE MORE EXTENSIVE ARTICLE AT THE LINK BELOW.

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2012-09-11/lifestyle/sns-2012091...

For more information, contact the National Teen Dating Violence Abuse Helpline 1-866-331-9474.

Dr. Sue Hubbard is a nationally known pediatrician and co-host of "The Kid's Doctor" radio show. Submit questions at http://www.kidsdr.com

OneWorld Progressive Institute has done comprehensive community education programs about Domestic Violence.  Clips from each program can be found at these links:

 http://youtu.be/ZnHUsGGIqoI

http://youtu.be/_1QjqODOkcY

PLEASE - TALK TO YOUR TEEN ABOUT DATING VIOLENCE

LOVE IS RESPECT - BREAK THE CYCLE OF VIOLENCE –NATIONAL DATING ABUSE HELPLINE

                                                                                1 – 866 -331 -9474 OR 1-866- 331-8453 TTY

Helpful tips for parents:

  • Do your own research on teen dating violence to get the facts before talking to your teen.
  • Start with the information and resources on thesafespace.org
  • Provide your teen with examples of healthy relationships, pointing out unhealthy behavior.
  • Use examples from your own life, television, movies or music.
  • Ask questions and encourage open discussion. Make sure you listen to your teen, giving         them a chance to speak. Avoid analyzing, interruptions, lecturing or accusations.
  • Keep it low key. Do not push if your teen is not ready to talk. Try again another time.

Starter questions:

  • Are any of your friends dating? What are their relationships like? What would you want in a   relationship?
  • Have you witnessed dating violence at school or among friends? How does it make you feel? Were you scared?
  • Do you know what you would do if you witnessed or experienced abuse?
  • Has anyone you know posted anything bad about a friend online? What happened afterwards?
  • Would it be weird if someone you were dating texted you all day to ask you what you’re doing?

Helpful Hints and Starter Questions in this BLOG are taken from the Michigan.Gov web site at: http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdch/Talking_To_Your_Teen_About_D...

 

 

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