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OneWorld Honors Dolores Huerta – 50 Years An Activist Leader

Dolores Huerta Is A Civil Rights Activist And Labor Leader.  She has been a giant in the fight against economic inequality, racism and patriarchy for more than 50 years. She is now 84-years-old and is still fighting for justice for women and for civil rights.  Ms Dolores Clara Fernandez Huerta was born in 1930 in New Mexico.  Throughout her adult life she has fought for equality for women, against discrimination and exploitation of farm workers, and for equity for Latinas across America.  Her record of struggle is legendary.

“Dolores encountered much racism growing up. In school she remembers a teacher accusing her of stealing another student’s work because of her ethnicity and giving her an unfair grade. On the way to a party celebrating the end of World War II she found her brother badly beaten because of the zoot-suit he was wearing, which was a popular fashion for Latinos at the time.”

Sadly, in 2014, Latinos, Blacks and many Native Americans still encounter discrimination based on racism and negative stereotypical attitudes. While much has changed in America, much remains the same and is extremely detrimental to people of color, particularly to black and brown children. Many African American and Hispanic students are still accused of cheating (especially at the college level) in 2014. It is difficult to evaluate the full long-term, psychological impact of this type of discrimination; it takes a toll on us.

Along with Cesar Chavez, in 1962, Ms. Huerta was the co-founder of the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA). This was the predecessor to the United Farm Workers Union (UWF), formed in 1965. Dolores Huerta served as Vice President of the UWF until 1999. Interestingly, most of us have heard of Cesar Chavez but much less about Ms. Huerta, although she was equally effective in that struggle; today she continues to fight for the rights of farm workers, women and for civil rights and economic justice for people of color.

The term used by President Obama – “Yes We Can” is translated "Si se puede". This phrase was coined by Dolores Huerta decades ago; the President acknowledges that he had her permission to use it. How can someone who has made such significant contributions be so hidden from today’s generations? Hidden from America’s activist history? Patriarchy is one answer; the other is that the mainstream media decides who is honored and who is maligned or ignored.  Those of us who use alternative media can be more vigilant in showcasing people such as Ms. Huerta. She marched with Martin Luther King, Cesar Chavez and Robert Kennedy. She is still fighting for economic equality.  Dolores Huerta is still contributing and making a POSITIVE difference to our world. Please visit the various links below to learn much more about this incredible American citizen, Latina and fighter for justice. She is the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom among many other awards.

See a short video about Ms. Huerta here: http://www.makers.com/dolores-huerta

Get more details here: http://www1.cuny.edu/portal_ur/content/womens_leadership/dolores_hu... Biography here: http://www.nwhm.org/education-resources/biography/biographies/dolor...

Change-Maker in Women's History: Dolores Huerta - https://www.dosomething.org/blog/chatterbox/change-maker-womens-his...

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