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MANY GOVT Officials DON’T UNDERSTAND the IMPORTANCE OF TRUST

CIVIC ENGAGEMENT: Help Citizens to Help Ourselves.  Be Honest with Us.

I strongly recommend reading the New Haven Independent article linked here.  It represents real journalism.  We seldom get investigative journalism any more.  Much of mainstream media is dedicated to one-upmanship and sensationalism.  Unless we stick to the New York Times, Washington Post, The Nation, Huffington Post and PBS for national news, and the NHI (along with a few other outlets for local news) we really don't get a good grasp on what is happening in our society.  Below are excerpts from the NHI's article titled: FBI Chief Tells Half The Story.  Please watch the short video of Pa...https://youtu.be/O0aZyjAwhEU  - Credit Taken, Blame Deflected

Paul Bass knows more about what is happening in New Haven and our CT cities than any of these highly paid pundits ever will.  He certainly cares more about it.

  • “The FBI’s embattled director came to town to tout his enlightened past remarks on race and policing and to credit a federal program for cutting New Haven’s gun violence.
  • He didn’t mention his more recent remarks that have inflamed racial tensions. Or the skyrocketing gun violence in another city, Bridgeport, with the same federal program.”

 Sitting in the audience at Coop on Monday it was difficult to figure out what some presenters were talking about. They were in the clouds somewhere or were simply posturing. Too few were factual.  Yes, there was a ‘uniformed’ show of cohesion, but little else.

  • The only reality came from those who spoke about the NHPS, what is being addressed and what needs to be addressed to produce more positive outcomes for students.  It was quite refreshing to hear.
  • There were some hard truths being told by the reps of the NHPS, not by the feds and certainly not by those who were simply there for their careers.
  • Honest Coalition Building demands first that real trust to be established.
  •  It is impossible for the fly-overs to see the affected areas. There was more interest in the state and federal representatives touting their paper accomplishments than coming up with solid action plans to make real changes that will produce positive outcomes.
  • FBI’s Comey clearly had his own agenda: save my job, at all costs, for the next 14 months!
  • How can there be any meaningful corrections if those at the helm cannot even admit there are problems?  Listening to the feds NH is suddenly all of Connecticut! Since when?
  • The problems in Bpt, Hartford and New London were not even acknowledged. Why Not? could it be that this was all about some people "looking good" than about really addressing the issues that will bring relief to those most affected?
  • CT is one of the safest states overall, but our major cities have problems to be addressed.  New Haven is one of those cities.  Yes, it is important to point out that improvements have been made. 
  • Be honest about the cause of those improvements; give credit at every level where credit is due, but also address where there are deep-rooted problems and talk about what all of us (as CT residents) can and should do to help to fix the problems that still exist.
  • Many of us are concerned that if the police and the feds start patting each other on the back for their imagined success- nothing else will be done to address the festering pockets of problems, and the problems will surge again. 
  • If you are the parent of the young person killed last month the drop in crime is not reflected in your experience. If your car was stolen last week, and your apartment robbed, you are not benefiting from the non-existent low crime rate.
  • If those who are committing crimes are perpetually on the loose, you cannot have confidence in law enforcement. Give citizens some workable tools.

After reading the NHI article linked here, please read the stats linked here.

These Are The 10 Most Dangerous Places in Connecticut

Connecticut may be one of the safest states in the U.S., but just like anywhere else, some areas within its borders are less safe than others.

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Neighborhoods: What is Working

Open Street Project

An Open Streets Family Reunion: Reflections from the 2018 Open Streets Summit

By Ryan O’Connor, Director of Programs, 8 80 Cities Recently 8 80 Cities wrote a blog post about open streets being a labour of love. That being the case, the 2018 Open Streets Summit in New Orleans felt like a family reunion of sorts. It was rejuvenating to see old and new friends who share our passion for open streets and are working tirelessly to create healthier, happier, and more connected communities across the world. The event, which took place on September 15-16, brought together more than 50 leaders who currently organize open streets programs or are interested in bringing the...

The post An Open Streets Family Reunion: Reflections from the 2018 Open Streets Summit appeared first on Open Streets Project.

Open Streets Summit Draft Agenda

We hope you are getting ready and feel excited about the Open Streets Summit in Gretna/New Orleans! Taking place from September 15-16, 2018, the Summit will feature tours, presentations and networking opportunities with open streets champions and organizers from across the continent. Attendees will learn about the nuts and bolts of starting or scaling up open streets programs, including: Route design and planning Partnerships with business and officials Social inclusion Safety and logistics Marketing and promotion Program evaluation through measurable goals and metrics If you haven’t done it yet, click here to register for the Open Streets Summit only or...

The post Open Streets Summit Draft Agenda appeared first on Open Streets Project.

Open Streets Summit Speakers Announced!

The Open Streets Project is proud to announce that Ed Solis from Viva Calle (San Jose, CA), Romel Pascual from CicLAvia (Los Angeles, CA), Jaymie Santiago and Charles Brown from New Brunswick Ciclovia will join us as speakers for the 2018 Open Streets Summit in New Orleans and Gretna! Taking place from September 15-16 2018, the Summit will feature: Behind the scenes tour of the City of Gretna’s inaugural open streets program. Workshops, presentations, and networking opportunities with open streets champions and organizers from across the continent. Training and inspiration for both -novice and experienced- open streets organizers and supporters...

The post Open Streets Summit Speakers Announced! appeared first on Open Streets Project.

Local Initiatives Support Corporation

Walking the Talk of Racial Equity

LISC Phoenix’s Dominic Braham is a 2019 PLACES fellow with the Funder’s Network for Smart Growth and Livable Communities (alongside LISC NYC's Grace Chung). When the fellowship brought him to Newark, NJ for a site visit, it sparked a realization: Braham saw that he had to think critically about pushing for racial equity from both an individual and an institutional perspective. In a blog for the Funder’s Network, he shares the toolbox he’s been assembling to challenge the status quo in community development leadership, and to convert conversations about change into action.

What Opportunity Zones Could Do For Schools

If Opportunity Zones are to empower residents, then directing OZ funds to education must be part of the investment equation. That’s the message of an in depth article in Education Next (published by Harvard’s Kennedy School) which cites LISC’s work in the Opportunity Zones—and our OZ playbook for community partners—as vital to helping residents reap the promised benefits of the tax legislation.

A LISC Woman of Influence on the Force of Small Biz in MKE

Donsia Strong-Hill, executive director of LISC Milwaukee, was tapped to give the keynote address at Milwaukee Biz Journal’s Women of Influence Awards last week—and to mark that distinction, the Journal interviewed her about LISC’s investments to spark and grow small businesses in historically underinvested, minority communities. It’s a critical tool, said Strong-Hill, for supporting families of color to build generational wealth.

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