GNH Community

nonprofits,local leaders & Grt.New Haven business sharing information

For Baby Boomers Alzheimer’s Might Show-Up Differently

The information provided in this article by Lisa Rapaport is most informative and certainly worth reading and sharing.  At the end of the article are links to segments of a two-part program done by OneWorld with a  physician, an assessment specialist and loved ones of Alzheimer's patients.

Memory loss may not always be first sign of Alzheimer’s

(By Lisa Rapaport, Reuters)

(Reuters Health) - While memory loss is thought to be a classical first sign of Alzheimer’s disease, some middle-aged people and younger seniors may initially experience different cognitive problems such as trouble with language or problem solving, a large U.S. study suggests.

Researchers reviewed data on early symptoms for almost 8,000 Alzheimer’s patients and found one in four people under age 60 had a chief complaint unrelated to memory, though memory was by far still the most common problem overall.

“Non-memory first cognitive symptoms were more common in younger Alzheimer’s disease patients,” lead study author Josephine Barnes, a researcher at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London, said by email. “Tests which explore and investigate these non-memory cognitive problems should be used so that non-memory deficits are not overlooked.”

Alzheimer’s is a brain disorder than gradually destroys memory and thinking skills and eventually leaves people unable to carry out simple tasks like dressing or eating. The disease is the most common cause of dementia among older adults, and afflicts more than 5 million Americans, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Inside the brain, Alzheimer’s is associated with abnormal clumps known as amyloid plaques and tangled bundles of fibers, often called tau or tangles. Scientists suspect that the damage begins in the hippocampus, a region of the brain involved in memory.

Barnes and colleagues reviewed neurological test results from a large U.S. database of Alzheimer’s patients to see whether the early symptoms people reported differed by age.

On average, patients were 75 years old when they first sought treatment for Alzheimer’s, though they ranged in age from 36 to 110. Most of them had mild to moderate dementia.

Among the patients who reported cognitive difficulties as their first symptoms, the proportion citing something other than memory shrank with increasing age. One in five patients in their 60s cited difficulties unrelated to memory, but this dropped to one in 10 for people in their 70s.

Because Alzheimer’s can only be definitively diagnosed after death by looking for tangles and plaque on the brain during an autopsy, this study like others exploring the disease runs the risk of including at least some patients who don’t actually have the condition, the authors acknowledge in the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia.

In addition, it’s possible that because the study drew patients from academic medical centers, it lured more complex cases and might not be representative of a typical Alzheimer’s patient, the authors note.

Understanding how Alzheimer’s symptoms might surface in younger patients is crucial for diagnosing them sooner and starting treatment at a point when it can do the most good, said Dr. Andrew Budson, chief of cognitive and behavioral neurology at the VA Boston Healthcare System and a neurology professor at Boston University.

The best available medicine for the disease can only turn back the clock, reversing symptoms enough to give patients the same abilities they had up to a year earlier, Budson said.

“You can’t slow the clock down, you can just reset it,” Budson said. “It is much better to dial it back to repeat a year in your 60s than in your 80s.”

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1INu4Y1 Alzheimer’s and Dementia, online April 24, 2015.

http://goo.gl/9jsToR

Watch OneWorld's two-part health literacy program on Alzheimer's here: This is Alzheimer's - Part 1: https://youtu.be/jdEi4HmMxzU Yale MD, family members and Assessment specialist explain Alzheimer's.

Part 2 - Recognizing & Understanding Alzheimer's - The Role of Caregivers: https://youtu.be/0XY9YE71tjc 

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc., is a small group of committed volunteers who produce community information and education television programs on health literacy, education and civic engagement.  We also find good information and post informative blogs about issues we believe shine light and are beneficial to many in our communities.  Learn more about us at our web site: www.oneworldpi.org/  and visit our web health section at: http://www.oneworldpi.org/health/index.html  Please share our information with others.  Watch our informative television programs on your public access channels: Frontier (formerly AT&T), Channel 99, drop down; Charter Communications Chan. 21, and Comcast (Xfinity) Channels 10, 15, 18 & 26. http://goo.gl/k17xvx

Views: 20

Comment

You need to be a member of GNH Community to add comments!

Join GNH Community

Comment by N'Zinga Shani on May 22, 2015 at 1:20am

“Non-memory first cognitive symptoms were more common in younger Alzheimer’s disease patients,” lead study author Josephine Barnes, a researcher at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London, said by email. “Tests which explore and investigate these non-memory cognitive problems should be used so that non-memory deficits are not overlooked.”  OneWorld Progressive Institute, presented a two-part program about dementia; segments can be seen on our YouTube channel linked in the blog above.

Now available in multiple languages

Welcome (Bienvenido, Benvenuto, Powitanie, Bonjour! Willkomme,歡迎, ברוךהבא أهلا وسهلا, Bonvenon) to GNH Community

traducción, traduzione, tłumaczenie, traduction, Übersetzung, 翻译, תרגום أهلا ترجمة, traduko

                    

Imagine. Inform. Invest. Inspire.

Working together to build a stronger community - now and forever

Neighborhoods: What is Working

Open Street Project

An Open Streets Family Reunion: Reflections from the 2018 Open Streets Summit

By Ryan O’Connor, Director of Programs, 8 80 Cities Recently 8 80 Cities wrote a blog post about open streets being a labour of love. That being the case, the 2018 Open Streets Summit in New Orleans felt like a family reunion of sorts. It was rejuvenating to see old and new friends who share our passion for open streets and are working tirelessly to create healthier, happier, and more connected communities across the world. The event, which took place on September 15-16, brought together more than 50 leaders who currently organize open streets programs or are interested in bringing the...

The post An Open Streets Family Reunion: Reflections from the 2018 Open Streets Summit appeared first on Open Streets Project.

Open Streets Summit Draft Agenda

We hope you are getting ready and feel excited about the Open Streets Summit in Gretna/New Orleans! Taking place from September 15-16, 2018, the Summit will feature tours, presentations and networking opportunities with open streets champions and organizers from across the continent. Attendees will learn about the nuts and bolts of starting or scaling up open streets programs, including: Route design and planning Partnerships with business and officials Social inclusion Safety and logistics Marketing and promotion Program evaluation through measurable goals and metrics If you haven’t done it yet, click here to register for the Open Streets Summit only or...

The post Open Streets Summit Draft Agenda appeared first on Open Streets Project.

Open Streets Summit Speakers Announced!

The Open Streets Project is proud to announce that Ed Solis from Viva Calle (San Jose, CA), Romel Pascual from CicLAvia (Los Angeles, CA), Jaymie Santiago and Charles Brown from New Brunswick Ciclovia will join us as speakers for the 2018 Open Streets Summit in New Orleans and Gretna! Taking place from September 15-16 2018, the Summit will feature: Behind the scenes tour of the City of Gretna’s inaugural open streets program. Workshops, presentations, and networking opportunities with open streets champions and organizers from across the continent. Training and inspiration for both -novice and experienced- open streets organizers and supporters...

The post Open Streets Summit Speakers Announced! appeared first on Open Streets Project.

Local Initiatives Support Corporation

In Forbes, Props for LISC’s Work With ESPN & Under Armour to Make Space for Play

An in-depth article in Forbes looks at how ESPN is putting its weight behind programs to boost sports and play in under-resourced places, and calls out LISC’s innovative RePlay partnership with ESPN and Under Armour. Since the collaboration began, we’ve helped 12 community organizations and schools revitalize play spaces and other facilities that promote physical and emotional wellbeing for hundreds of young people in Baltimore neighborhoods with high rates of poverty.

LISC Turns 40!

And we've got a lot to celebrate: $20 billion in total investments, record impact in 2018, a 20-year collaboration with the NFL Foundation, and the list goes on. At a gala event in New York City, LISC honors the indispensable work of our partner organizations and the two-decade service of our board chair, former Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin.

A Model Worth Copying: Joint Ownership Structures for CDCs

In an in-depth article for The Journal of Affordable Housing and Community Development Law, attorneys David Goldstein and Jason Labate offer a case study of the Joint Operating Entity NYC (JOE NYC), which LISC has supported from its inception. The JOE NYC, a consortium of CDCs that have pooled their portfolios and expertise, is a blueprint that can help CDCs in other cities and regions shore up their stability in challenging markets and gain ground against the national affordability crisis.

© 2019   Created by Lee Cruz.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service