GNH Community

nonprofits,local leaders & Grt.New Haven business sharing information

A Black Mississippi Judge's Breathtaking Speech To 3 White Murderers

February 13, 2015, 12:54 PM ET (This too is a part of 21st Century American History)

As you read this, OneWorld, Inc  reminds you that James Craig Anderson was killed in 2011! There is no sense of satisfaction in writing, compiling, reading or posting these blogs. But we must remain vigilant, and we must be consistently aware; we must prepare our children so that they may remain safe as they traverse life and our often mean and dangerous streets every-where. As we reflect on the many outstanding accomplishments that black people have made, and the obstacles we have overcome, we must also constructively and steadfastly deal with the distance yet to go to achieve equity in our humanity and our rights as citizens of the USA.

In Jasper, Texas on June 9, 1998, James Byrd, a 49 year-old African American man was tied to the back of a pick-up truck and dragged several miles to his mangled death in Texas (USA). Three white men were charged with his murder: http://www.nytimes.com/1998/06/10/us/black-man-fatally-dragged-in-a...

Here's an astonishing speech by U.S. District Judge Carlton Reeves, one of just two African-Americans to have ever served as federal judges in Mississippi. He read it to three young white men before sentencing them for the death of a 48-year-old black man named James Craig Anderson in a parking lot in Jackson, Miss., one night in 2011. They were part of a group that beat Anderson and then killed him by running over his body with a truck, yelling "white power" as they drove off.

The speech is long; Reeves asked the young men to sit down while he read it aloud in the courtroom. And it's breathtaking, in both the moral force of its arguments and the palpable sadness with which they are delivered. We have decided to publish the speech, which we got from the blog Breach of Peace, in its entirety below. A warning to readers: He uses the word "nigger" 11 times.

One of my former history professors, Dennis Mitchell, recently released a history book entitled, A New History of Mississippi. "Mississippi," he says, "is a place and a state of mind. The name evokes strong reactions from those who live here and from those who do not, but who think they know something about its people and their past." Because of its past, as described by Anthony Walton in his book, Mississippi: An American Journey, Mississippi "can be considered one of the most prominent scars on the map" of these United States. Walton goes on to explain that "there is something different about Mississippi; something almost unspeakably primal and vicious; something savage unleashed there that has yet to come to rest." To prove his point, he notes that, "[o]f the 40 martyrs whose names are inscribed in the national Civil Rights Memorial in Montgomery, AL, 19 were killed in Mississippi." "How was it," Walton asks, "that half who died did so in one state?" — my Mississippi, your Mississippi and our Mississippi.

Mississippi has expressed its savagery in a number of ways throughout its history — slavery being the cruelest example, but a close second being Mississippi's infatuation with lynchings. Lynchings were prevalent, prominent and participatory. A lynching was a public ritual — even carnival-like — within many states in our great nation. While other states engaged in these atrocities, those in the Deep South took a leadership role, especially that scar on the map of America — those 82 counties between the Tennessee line and the Gulf of Mexico and bordered by Louisiana, Arkansas and Alabama.

Vivid accounts of brutal and terrifying lynchings in Mississippi are chronicled in various sources: Ralph Ginzburg's 100 Years of Lynching and Without Sanctuary: Lynching Photography in America, just to name two. But I note that today, the Equal Justice Initiative released Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror; apparently, it too is a must-read.

"They came ready to hurt. They used dangerous weapons; they targeted the weak; they recruited and encouraged others to join in the coordinated chaos; and they boasted about their shameful activity. This was a 2011 version of the nigger hunts."

Here is a direct link to Judge Carlton Reeves speech: http://breachofpeace.com/blog/?p=612 NPR: http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2015/02/12/385777366/a-black-m...

"In Without Sanctuary, historian Leon Litwack writes that between 1882 and 1968 an estimated 4,742 blacks met their deaths at the hands of lynch mobs."  We now know with certainty that many more blacks died at the hands of lynch mobs.

In the last six months of 2014, these are the young black men who have been killed in America by the police.  These are only the ones that have made the newsThere is no doubt that there are many more whose deaths have not made the national news.  Again, these are young black men who have been killed by the police.  There is a message here to the haters and the white power advocates; there is a message to those who still believe that black people are less than human. Rumain Brisbon, age 34; killed 12/2/14, was the father of twin girls; Tamir Rice, age 12, killed 11/22/14;  Akai Gurley, age 28, killed 11/20/14; Kajieme Powell, 25, killed 8/19/14; Ezell Ford, 25, killed 8/12/14; Dante Parker, 36, killed 8/12/14; Michael Brown, 18, killed 8/9/14; John Crawford, 22, killed 8/5/14; Tyree Woodson, 38, killed 8/2/14; Eric Garner, 43, killed 7/17/14.

At this link you can see the many images of unarmed black men and women killed-- while in the custody of police-- between  1999 and 2014: http://gawker.com/unarmed-people-of-color-killed-by-police-1999-201...

Cop Kills Unarmed Black Man in Arizona Rumain Brisbon, an unarmed black father of four, was shot to death in Arizona Tuesday when a police officer apparently mistook his bottle of pills for a gun. http://gawker.com/unarmed-people-of-color-killed-by-police-1999-201...

 OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc., is a small group of committed volunteers who produce community information and education television programs on health literacy, education and civic engagement.  We also find good information and post informative blogs about issues we believe shine light and are beneficial to many in our communities.  Learn more about us at our web site: www.oneworldpi.org/  and visit our Civic Engagement section at: http://www.oneworldpi.org/civic_engagement/index.html We are about Civic Engagement & Public Good.

http://www.youtube.com/user/oneworldpi/videos - OneWorld’s YouTube – See us also on: https://www.facebook.com/pages/OneWorld-Progressive-Institute-Inc/151551484879941

Views: 181

Comment

You need to be a member of GNH Community to add comments!

Join GNH Community

Now available in multiple languages

Welcome (Bienvenido, Benvenuto, Powitanie, Bonjour! Willkomme,歡迎, ברוךהבא أهلا وسهلا, Bonvenon) to GNH Community

traducción, traduzione, tłumaczenie, traduction, Übersetzung, 翻译, תרגום أهلا ترجمة, traduko

                    

Imagine. Inform. Invest. Inspire.

Working together to build a stronger community - now and forever

Neighborhoods: What is Working

The Four Essential Elements of an Asset-Based Community Development Process

John and ABCD Institute faculty member Cormac Russell explain what is distinctive about an Asset-Based Community Development process.

Money and the Civic Impulse

One of the most powerful ways to immobilize citizen engagement can be outside money, even when purported to be available for citizen engagement.

Money and the Civic Impulse

One of the most powerful ways to immobilize citizen engagement can be outside money, even when purported to be available for citizen engagement.

Open Street Project

Open Streets Summit Draft Agenda

We hope you are getting ready and feel excited about the Open Streets Summit in Gretna/New Orleans! Taking place from September 15-16, 2018, the Summit will feature tours, presentations and networking opportunities with open streets champions and organizers from across the continent. Attendees will learn about the nuts and bolts of starting or scaling up open streets programs, including: Route design and planning Partnerships with business and officials Social inclusion Safety and logistics Marketing and promotion Program evaluation through measurable goals and metrics If you haven’t done it yet, click here to register for the Open Streets Summit only or...

The post Open Streets Summit Draft Agenda appeared first on Open Streets Project.

Open Streets Summit Speakers Announced!

The Open Streets Project is proud to announce that Ed Solis from Viva Calle (San Jose, CA), Romel Pascual from CicLAvia (Los Angeles, CA), Jaymie Santiago and Charles Brown from New Brunswick Ciclovia will join us as speakers for the 2018 Open Streets Summit in New Orleans and Gretna! Taking place from September 15-16 2018, the Summit will feature: Behind the scenes tour of the City of Gretna’s inaugural open streets program. Workshops, presentations, and networking opportunities with open streets champions and organizers from across the continent. Training and inspiration for both -novice and experienced- open streets organizers and supporters...

The post Open Streets Summit Speakers Announced! appeared first on Open Streets Project.

REGISTRATION IS OPEN FOR the Open Streets Summit 2018 in New Orleans!

The Open Streets Project is partnering with Walk Bike Places and the City of Gretna to deliver an educational Open Streets Summit in Gretna and New Orleans, from September 15-16 2018. Download the Agenda Summit Description The Summit will feature a behind the scenes tour of the City of Gretna’s inaugural open streets program, as well as breakout sessions, networking opportunities, and a World Café with open streets champions and organizers from across the continent. The Summit will provide inspiration and practical tips for both -novice and experienced- open streets organizers and supporters from public health, transportation, planning, public space,...

The post REGISTRATION IS OPEN FOR the Open Streets Summit 2018 in New Orleans! appeared first on Open Streets Project.

Local Initiatives Support Corporation

JPMorgan Chase Fuels Economic Development in Philly, Milwaukee

LISC-led coalitions in Milwaukee and Philadelphia are among the four winners of this year’s JPMorgan Chase PRO Neighborhoods competition. In each city, local partners are pooling their expertise and resources to drive major community-focused economic development plans that revitalize commercial corridors, spur small businesses, create jobs and raise standards of living for residents.

Fast Company: ‘26x26’ Will Boost Soccer, Kids, Communities

Soccer fans have been cheering LISC's $30 million collaboration with Lionsraw and American Outlaws to fuel soccer facilities and youth programming in underserved communities. But the effort to invest in 26 fields by the 2026 World Cup is about much more than scoring goals; the program is set to empower 1 million kids and improve the health of their communities as well. Fast Company takes an in-depth look.

Hispanic Heritage Is Integral to the American Experiment—and American Potential

LISC CEO Maurice A. Jones marks the close of Hispanic Heritage Month reflecting on the extraordinary talent and assets Latino Americans inject into our communities, and how our partnerships work to harness those assets for the benefit of all.

© 2018   Created by Lee Cruz.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service