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I believe that the creative sector has the potential to address urban poverty as well as urban vitality. I came across the article that I attached to this discussion as a way of introducing the idea for economic development through the power of the arts. In my neighborhood of Fair Haven I have been imagining the beauty and economic incubation potential for an Artisan Market on Grand Avenue. I am looking for some arts minded individuals who are willing to be stake holders in a conversation around this exciting idea.

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Ken,

I can't agree with you more. this is a great article on bringing the economic benefits of the creative economy to neighborhoods. I believe that it is extremely important that the neighborhoods in New Haven begin to use their creative resources to bring about economic development. We have so many great neighborhoods that have a wealth of creative resources. I look forward to seeing how the Artisan Market develops on Grand Ave.
Hi Ken,

Visit www.hendersonartproject.com to view a project with a similar mission as the Fair Haven Artisan Market.

To participate in the discussion, go to http://blog.dallasurbanart.com
This is my review of the Creative Economy to Creative Society article.
Attachments:
Finally, as you know Ken, when people come together and collaborate, the potential is unlimited. The challenge is bringing people together for a common cause and then harnassing the energy of all the stakeholders.

I've started creating a tool that will facilitate collaboration of the creative community utilizing digital media. Visit www.artistconsortium.org for a glimpse at this project as it progresses.
It goes beyond urban vitality; creative types and innovators appreciate vibrant cities and are attracted to them. New Haven is increasingly getting the reputation of being the "trendy" and "hip" city of Connecticut, and this is a good thing - a vital city is important for economic growth.

The question is: how do we promote hipsterism without falling into gentrification? We don´t want New Haven to be "rich"; it is important to preserve and promote mixed income neighborhoods.
Roger,

I think that you make a great point here and ask a great question. I think that the answer might be found in developing not only the creative resources but the cultural resources of our neighborhoods. Each distinct neighborhood has a wealth of cultural and creative resources that can promote economic development, as well as community development. Downtown New Haven can not be the only place where arts and culture are growing. Fair Haven, Westville, East Rock, Wooster Square, The Hill, Edgewood, and the many others all have the human capital to become neighborhoods of creativity, culture, and sustainability.

My question is, how does this happen? How do citizens develop the cultural and creative economies of our neighborhoods?

I would be interested in further discussing this with a group of diverse individuals. Maybe a little brainstorming. Who knows maybe we can come up with some innovative ideas. Anybody interested?

Roger Senserrich - CAHS said:
It goes beyond urban vitality; creative types and innovators appreciate vibrant cities and are attracted to them. New Haven is increasingly getting the reputation of being the "trendy" and "hip" city of Connecticut, and this is a good thing - a vital city is important for economic growth.

The question is: how do we promote hipsterism without falling into gentrification? We don´t want New Haven to be "rich"; it is important to preserve and promote mixed income neighborhoods.
I would be interested - and I have a good amount of friends on the music scene that probably can bring some ideas. New Haven needs more music joints, for instance. :-)

Anyway, we should get something going in this regard.

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