GNH Community

nonprofits,local leaders & Grt.New Haven business sharing information

Why Everyone Should Be Paying attention to the Medicaid Debate

AUGUST 31, 2017


One of the most controversial elements of that debate is Medicaid. Despite the broad news coverage on this topic, there is still a great deal of misunderstanding about what Medicaid is, who uses it, and how it’s spent.

Not just for the unemployed and the poor

Conservative groups opposed to Medicaid spending would have the public believe that the program is creating an “entitlement society” in which able-bodied people choose to depend on government programs like Medicaid instead of working.

Partly because of the way this kind of rhetoric has been repeated by certain media outlets, many people mistakenly assume that Medicaid is spent strictly on providing healthcare services to the unemployed and the poor. However, the actual numbers do not support this assumption.

According to a report published by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF), approximately 28% of the overall Medicaid budget is spent on long-term care for s.... In a related report, the KFF shows how that percentage translates into Medicaid paying for 62% of all nursing home residents in 2014.

The harsh truth is that long-term care is exorbitantly expensive, and that even people who have tried to plan ahead and save enough to cover the costs simply cannot afford the care that they need.

Costs of Care in Connecticut

In 2016, Genworth (a life and annuity insurance company) ran a Cost of Care Survey that included data from15,000 respondents across 440 regions in the United States. For the state of Connecticut, the median monthly and annual costs for various kinds of long-term care were as follows:

Home Health Care: $3,813 / $45,760

Home Health Aide: $4,195 / $50,336

Adult Day Health Care: $1,751 / $21,008

Assisted Living Facility: $4,950 / $59,400

Nursing Home – Semi-private Room: $12,364 / $148,373

Nursing Home – Private Room: $13,383 / $160,600

Looking at those numbers, it’s not hard to see why many people, even middle-class people who have done their best to prepare for needing long-term care, end up having to rely on Medicaid. Even people who have done all the right things, made smart financial decisions, and set money aside specifically for long-term care very often find that the money they saved doesn’t go nearly as far as they’d hoped.

It’s also important to note that paying for nursing homes and other kinds of long-term care is a challenge and hardship that most people will eventually have to confront. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates that “70% of people turning age 65 can expect to use some form of long-term care during their lives.” This is clearly an issue that will touch most senior Americans.

Burden falls on caregivers

In addition to the direct effects on the finances of the seniors who need long-term care, the rising costs of nursing homes and potential changes to Medicaid pose a very real threat to the financial stability and general well being of family members and friends.

If Medicaid is unavailable to cover the costs of long-term care, family and friends will need to step in to provide care. The financial and emotional burden of taking on this kind of responsibility can lead to extreme financial crisis, not only draining bank accounts but also keeping younger family members from being able to work. Apart from the cost concerns, taking on the role of primary caregiver can lead to depression, high stress, and anxiety.

The bottom line is that Medicaid is a critical part of our healthcare system. It’s a program that helps a wide variety of people and is particularly crucial to seniors from all walks of life who need long-term care as they get older. The Medicaid issue, and by extension the entire healthcare debate, is something everyone should care about.

Views: 70

Reply to This

Imagine. Inform. Invest. Inspire.

Working together to build a stronger community - now and forever

Neighborhoods: What is Working

How to Connect Neighborhood Churches to Your Local Community

Transcription of John and Peter's February 20, 2018 conversation with Paul Sparks, a leading voice in the growing Parish Movement. Paul has worked in more than 1,000 neighborhoods around the world to identify, connect, and support groups that want to have their neighborhoods flourish. In their conversation Paul talked about his own and his colleagues' work with local churches, academic institutions, and community organizations in the United States and abroad and offered ideas on how to translate their experiences into their listeners' own community-building work.

Parish Portrait: Mt Scott-Arleta, Portland, OR with B.D. Dormaier

How a few plants, a mural, and less pavement could bring more to a neighborhood than one big ministry.

Government Innovation Isn’t Your Main Problem

An undue focus on making government more innovative might inhibit you from working with the innovation that is going on and the innovators who are doing it.

Open Street Project

Join us for an Open Streets Study Tour October 6th-8th!

The Open Streets Project is partnering with the non-profit organization New Brunswick Tomorrow to deliver an educational Open Streets Study Tour in New Brunswick, NJ from October 6th - October 8th. The Study Tour will feature classroom sessions, networking opportunities, a behind the scenes tour of New Brunswick’s industry leading Ciclovia.

The post Join us for an Open Streets Study Tour October 6th-8th! appeared first on Open Streets Project.

Open Streets Project Revamped

The Open Streets Project has undergone some changes over the last year. We bid a sad farewell to project co-founder, the Alliance for Biking & Walking, who are moving on to other things, and we happily welcomed a new partner, international Open Streets leader 8 80 Cities. We are excited for all the possibilities and energy this partnership will bring.

The post Open Streets Project Revamped appeared first on Open Streets Project.

Local Initiatives Support Corporation

Our Kind of March Madness

Winter may be hanging on longer than expected (in some parts of the country), but at LISC, the month of March has blossomed like never before. In the last three weeks, we raised $68 million—from longstanding donors such as State Farm and Wells Fargo, through new partnerships with ProMedica, Union Pacific and the San Francisco Foundation, and with expanded public resources from the CDFI Fund and the city of Washington, DC. We’ll invest it. We’ll leverage it. We’ll use it to lift up underinvested neighborhoods and develop the skills of talented people in our neighborhoods. There’s still much to do to foster economic opportunity in our communities and we are grateful for this support, which helps us do the job. What a month it’s been. And we've still got a week to go!

State Farm Announces $4 Million Grant to LISC

LISC and State Farm expanded their long-time partnership this week with new funding to boost economic opportunities in 11 cities. "Millions of people are looking for opportunities to earn higher wages and build stronger futures for their families,” said Maurice Jones, LISC president and CEO. "Our partnership with State Farm is vital to advancing this important work.”

LISC Awarded CDFI Fund’s Largest Capital Magnet Fund Grant

The Treasury Department’s CDFI Fund announced a new round of Capital Magnet Fund grants to spur an expected $3.2 billion in affordable housing and economic development. LISC will use its $7.5 million award—the largest in this round of funding—to seed $150 million in development activity in urban and rural communities.

© 2018   Created by Lee Cruz.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service