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Yale Concert Band: From Rome to Athens

Event Details

Yale Concert Band: From Rome to Athens

Time: April 15, 2016 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Location: Woolsey Hall
Street: 500 College St
City/Town: New Haven
Website or Map:
Phone: (203) 432-4111
Event Type: concert
Organized By: Stephanie Hubbard
Latest Activity: Apr 15, 2016

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Event Description


Thomas C. Duffy, Music Director


Dances from Crete. Adam Gorb sends listeners on a musical tour of Crete through four dynamic movements, from a portrait of the Minotaur in the first, to the finale’s raucously triumphant Greek dance.


Aegean Festival Overture reflects the metrical asymmetry of Greek music. With its opening driving energy and subsequent lyric plaintiveness, Andreas Makris’ overture reflects a blend of classical form and Greek folkloristic elements.


Greek Folk Song Suite (Franco Cesarini). A delightful collection of tunes based on Greek folk music. The Yale Concert Band will perform this music in Athens, Greece, in June.


In October, Eric Whitacre captures the quiet beauty of the eponymous month. The music’s simple, pastoral melodies and lush harmonies evoke the clear autumn air and changes in light that characterize the transition from fall to winter.


Urbino. The United States premiere of Michele Mangani’s celebratory fanfare and march, commissioned to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the Urbino Wind Orchestra.  The Yale Concert Band will perform this piece under Maestro Mangani’s direction in Urbino, Italy, in May.


Stand the Storm (Julian Work). Work’s goal was to develop his own style of orchestration, using whatever compositional devices might best serve the needs of his current subject. Describing himself as a composer influenced by the music of Debussy and Ravel, Work deliberately tried to avoid falling into predictable patterns. This march does not sound like the “usual” march, but is a compelling compilation of meters, motives, and machinations!


Additional music: Americans We  (Henry Fillmore)


Public info phone: (203) 432-4111;

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